Monroe® - The right choice for hard-working trucks
from class 3 to 8.
Monroe® Commercial Vehicle ride control products are
application-engineered to match your driving needs.
Monroe® Commercial Vehicle shock absorbers are built for durability, even with the demands of high mileage and severe use.
Your single source supplier – featuring a complete line of ride control products for today’s medium, heavy-duty and industrial markets.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: e-Catalog

MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Dealer Locator

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MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Support
Monroe's Technical Support will help you find answers to the most frequently asked product and installation questions and provide invaluable technical training information. If you need additional information or assistance, Monroe's Ride Control Technical Assistance Team can assist you.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Tire Wear Indicators
Understanding the causes of wear pattern can save money and preserve safety. Replace worn shocks and suspension components.

MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Tire Costs are a Substantial Investment for Commercial Fleet and Truck Owners
Wear patterns present a wealth of information to trained technicians. An experienced technician can examine tire wear to identify potential issues:
  • Steer or drive axle misalignment
  • Mismatched tires to truck applications
  • Mechanical or drive train problems
  • Worn axle components
  • Worn ride control or suspension components

All drivers should request comprehensive tire examinations in their pre- and post- haul truck inspections. Identifying and correcting underlying wear causes should occur before a fresh set of tires is installed.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Thrust/Scrub Angle Wear
Thrust/Scrub Angle Wear
Thrust angle occurs when accelerated wear is evident on the inside of one drive tire, and on the outside of the opposing drive tire. This occurs when improperly aligned drive axles cause the truck to veer from a straight direction. Scrub occurs when axles are not parallel. A tire on one side of the truck rolls in a larger diameter than the tire on the other side, creating a hazardous strain on the tire.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Sidewall Wear
Sidewall Wear
Driver practices resulting in scrubbing or curbing are usually the key to avoiding damage-related sidewall wear. In applications where curbing is common, tires are available with protective features. Excessive curbing can result in "pinch shock," where a sidewall subjected to abnormally heavy loads results in a crimped core. That pinched core can accelerate abnormal wear and weaken the tire’s integrity.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Dog Tracking
Dog Tracking
When a tractor’s rear axles are not properly aligned with the axles of the trailer dog tracking occurs. The trailer literally tracks to the left or right. In severe cases, the driver sees more of one side of the trailer in his rear view mirror than the other. The wear pattern is similar to that of thrust angle. If the truck pulls constantly in one direction, drive axle mounting is the problem. If the truck wanders the likely problem is misaligned trailer axles.

MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Tire Camber
Tire Camber
Tires normally should be straight up and down; camber is outward or inward tilt. Negative camber is tires that are tilted at the top; positive camber is tires that are tilted at the bottom. Too much positive camber results in smooth wear on the outside of one of the tires. Too much negative camber leads to smooth wear on the inside of one of the tires.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Cupping Wear
Cupping Wear
Cupping results from loss of tire-to-road contact; an up-and-down motion affects the tire’s contact with the road surface. Worn ride control or suspension components create the vibrations that result in tire bounce. The wear indicatiors are a series of high and low spots that manifest on both the steer and trailer tire tread.
MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Flat-Spotting
Flat-Spotting
Flat-spotting begins as a lone, scrubbed band of tread running across the tire. The impacted area will be "flatter" than the tire surfaces. Flat-spotting is usually a braking issue, resulting from a locked or dragging foundation brake, a panic stop, or aggressive braking. If an inspection does not identify maintenance issues, the driver may require instructions in braking moderation.

MONROE® COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: Diagonal Wear
Diagonal Wear
Diagonal wear results from mechanical drive train forces and manifests as localized flat spots that cross the tire tread in a diagonal pattern. Because the forces repeat in frequency, the wear continually reoccurs. Diagonal wear is slow to develop and can be aggravated by alignment problems. Primary causes include worn or improperly adjusted bearings, differing tire diameters or mismatched or improperly inflated tires.